Comicon wrap-up

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Marvel fangirldom reaches new heights at the Black Widow costuming meetup. That’s me on the left in the 1950s outfit. And yes, I researched that.

So Phoenix Comicon has ended and somehow I’m still awake, with just enough energy left to write a blog post, although I can’t vouch for how coherent it will be. I certainly don’t have it in me to write a lot of words, so it’ll be a series of observations mostly cribbed from my Twitter feed.

  • Comicon, especially the dealer’s room, is complete sensory overload. I deal with this by limiting what I take in, which means I might miss things but also saves me money. I spent $19 in the dealer’s room. My husband spent an obscene amount that I prefer not to know.
  • What I did notice was charming. The guy in the Batman t-shirt getting a fistbump from a guy in full Batman regalia. The teenager jumping over rows of stairs to get a photo of the Mayor from Nightmare Before Christmas. The teens dressed as Bob Ross (yes, Bob “happy little tree” Ross) and Deadpool, a match made in somewhere I can’t imagine and don’t really want to visit.
  • My costumes tend to be so subtle that people walking by don’t realize what they are. Vendors, however, have time to observe me as a customer and figure out the costume. Then they laugh. Vendors are my biggest costuming fans. (All my artistic endeavors have a limited audience. See my “I’m the stripper in the satin gloves” post.)
  • The writing panels tend to hit the same topics over and over, a trend I noticed back when I was a notable enough author to get on convention panels. The “Marketing Your Novel” panel was full – unusual for any panel at Comicon and especially for fairly early on a Sunday – all aspiring writers seeking wisdom. I was there too, and I’d heard it all before. I’d said half of it before myself. Are we all looking for some magic bullet, some secret to success? The answer is the same as it’s always been: work hard, be professional, and hope for that lucky break.
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